We help businesses, communities and governments ensure that economic development in conflict-affected countries is inclusive and sustainable, so that peace and prosperity go hand in hand.

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Introduction: 

Investment, trade and aid can generate significant economic wealth and help support social development, but can also have adverse effects on local communities and economies.

We help businesses, communities and governments ensure that economic development in conflict-affected countries is inclusive and sustainable, so that peace and prosperity go hand in hand.

We advise companies, governments and international institutions on how to enhance the peacebuilding potential of their economic policies, and help local communities to shape and benefit from economic development.

Why: 

Domestic and international investment and trade can play a positive and important role in supporting peace and development in conflict-prone countries.

This needs to be reflected in the international community’s economic development efforts and government policies and practices, which should promote and support activities that encourage economic recovery and private sector development.

Businesses that invest in conflict-prone or high-risk areas often experience reduced access to markets and capital, damaged infrastructure and direct attacks on personnel and assets. But by proactively adopting policies and practices that are sensitive to local conflict contexts, comply with human rights standards and follow best practices in corporate sustainability, businesses can minimise any adverse impact their conduct and investment could have on local communities. In doing so, they can also reduce risks to their operations and contribute to local stability and development.

It is important to empower local populations and civil society organisations in these processes, to better protect their rights, and to shape and benefit from the economic activities affecting their communities.

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What we mean by economic development for peace

Think of thousands of small-scale traders crossing the border between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda selling or purchasing goods every single day. Business owners creating a business and development network across the Caucasus. Or banks, governments and investors coming together to promote economic development in the Middle East as part of the response to the crisis in Syria.

An issue of governance

On 10–11 December, International Alert and the Uganda Fisheries and Fish Conservation Association (UFFCA) convened a consultative meeting to discuss proposed government changes to the Beach Management Units Statute.

Towards a peace economy in Lebanon

International Alert recently published a report, Towards a peace economy in Lebanon, which examines the ways in which governance of Lebanon’s economy underpins its structural and overt conflict dynamics.

Oil and water?

International Alert is proud to announce the launch of our new photo essay, Oil and water?, which looks at the interaction between oil exploitation and other sources of livelihood in Uganda.

Oil and water?

The discovery of commercially viable oil in Uganda’s Albertine Graben region in 2006 set in motion the race for oil wealth across the country. As Uganda moves from exploration and appraisal to production, civil society organisations in both Uganda and the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have been raising concerns over the potential impact of oil activi