We help mining, oil and gas companies adopt business practices that take into account the conflict risks and peace opportunities of their activities, and work with communities and governments to manage and use their natural resources peacefully.

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Introduction: 

Businesses can play a positive role in contributing to peaceful economic development, but at times can also exacerbate tensions and fuel violent conflict.

We help mining, oil and gas companies adopt business practices that take into account the conflict risks and peace opportunities of their activities, and work with communities and governments to manage and use their natural resources peacefully.

We advise and train businesses to assess the risks and impacts of their operations on communities, and promote greater communication between companies and local people, to ensure economic activities do not fuel tensions or violence.

Why: 

Natural resources can provide opportunities to increase economic development in fragile and conflict-affected states.

However, in many cases the lack of effective and inclusive management leads to unchecked and violent competition, increased corruption, damaging socio-economic change and inequity of wealth distribution, leading to greater instability and violence.

Improving the knowledge and understanding of governments, companies and communities of natural resource management, improving the flow of information between them and creating opportunities for dialogue, can help prevent or manage these conflicts.

Moreover, if natural resources are managed in a way that is more equitable, sustainable and inclusive, this can create greater incentives for peace, such as shared material benefits and increased interdependence.

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Squaring the circle: Is it time to stop this 0.7% nonsense?

People and organisations in the UK’s overseas development sector are getting hot under the collar. This is because the government is not prioritising legislation to enshrine a perpetual commitment to spend 0.7% of UK Gross National Income on overseas development aid. Letters are being drafted, articles are being written, politicians are being lobbied. After all, this issue has cross-party support, so why not just rush it through parliament?  

Unpicking the language of the New Deal

International aid donors and the poorer governments they fund have overlapping, but far from identical interests. They overlap in their common desire to spend donor money in support of development progress, broadly put. But they often differ on what are the best development choices, and on issues like the need or opportunity for compliance with human rights and good financial stewardship norms.

Did the high level forum contribute to aid-effectiveness in conflict-affected countries? A scorecard from Busan

At the end of November, 2,000 representatives of governments, international organisations and NGOs convened in Busan as the fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness. Just before the meeting we proposed five criteria by which to judge its outcome as far as conflict-affected and fragile countries are concerned.

What will success at Busan look like for conflict-affected countries?

Two thousand representatives of governments, the UN, other multilateral organisations and NGOs will shortly convene in Busan, South Korea, as the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness to discuss the effectiveness of overseas development aid. It’s countries affected by armed conflict that face the toughest development challenges. What would success at Busan look like for them?